Tag Archive for Walking Dead

The Walking Dead Recap: “Strangers” (Season 5, Episode 2)

My copy of last week’s season premiere was missing a crucial post-credits element: a masked man on the tracks follows an X carved into a tree just after Rick and crew pass; he takes off the mask to better see his surroundings, and it’s none other than Morgan. A blast form the past, looking considerably less nuts than last time we saw him. So far in season five, it appears everything’s coming full circle.

In this week’s edition, our newly reunited crew of misfits look on from a “safe” distance as the fire burns at Terminus; billowing smoke fills the sky. From the opening moments, the pacing feels a little off. The cameraman trains his focus on the Good Guys as they walk – always walking – and then slows everything down. While this could be used to indicate the repetiveness, the monotony, of their lives on the road, it’s not terribly effective. Tara’s breasts bounce in slow-mo, and the expression we’ve all come to associate with Rick, his stone-faced, hollow-eyed stare, carries our crew forward through the woods. Exciting it is not.

The opening minutes of the episode feature people talking and not talking; they’re not yet revealing the things hidden beneath the surface. Tara hasn’t told Maggie she was with the Governor at the prison, and it’s eating away at her. Rick admits he shouldn’t have banished Carol “to this,” and now they’re joining her in it. Carol gives a tiny smile and nod at his genuine apology and gratitude. She saved their lives, and her actions have redeemed her…to everyone but herself, it seems.

Tyreese, who now considers Carol an ally and confidante despite what she did to his lover, tells them he’ll talk to the crew and make sure everyone accepts her. “They don’t have to,” says Carol. But Tyreese insists they do have to accept her. Unity is important, understanding and respect even moreso, in the new world. However, he doesn’t want to tell anyone about the girls – about what happened to Lizzie and Mika. “I just need to forget it,” he sighs.

Carol repeats this assertion to Daryl as they stand watch in the night. He’s eyeing her, waiting for her to speak. “I can’t. I just need to forget,” she tells him. Daryl hears something (or feels it), and leaps to his feet to check it out. Even though his skin is crawling, he decides it’s nothing – but a silhouette passes in the darkness.

On the road the next morning, Bob and Sasha play a word game: she names off the hardships of their new lives, and Bob counters with the sunny side of it. “No privacy,” Sasha says with a sly grin, and Bob replies, “A captive audience!” and kisses her. Bob’s constant optimism is getting threadbare, though. He was only a minor part of the last season, but we know from his early behavior – from the way he risked everyone’s lives in order to chug some booze – that he’s no angel despite what he portrays to everybody else.

Jesus can't help you here, bud. Photo credit Gene Page/AMC.

Jesus can’t help you here, bud. Photo credit Gene Page/AMC.

Suddenly, screams for help pour from the woods. The crew follows them at Carl’s insistence and saves a priest, perched on a boulder surrounded by walkers. The last time we caught sight of any religious iconography was before Beth disappeared, and that’s no coincidence. The priest’s name is Gabriel, and he vomits everywhere to show his gratitude. After checking him for weapons (despite Gabriel’s protests that “the word of God is the only protection I need,” to which Daryl murmurs, “Sure didn’t look like it”) Rick asks him the three key questions:

“How many walkers have you killed?” None.
“How many humans have you killed?” None.
“Why?” “Because the Lord abhors violence.” Read more

The Walking Dead Recap: “No Sanctuary” (Season 5, Episode 1)

The Walking Dead has never really been about the dead. It’s about the living, and the myriad ways in which people adapt (or don’t) to a new world order, one that thrives on chaos and death. Even the credits in season five reflect the new world; candles dribble wax and axes drip blood, buildings crumble under nature’s influence, crows light in trees waiting for corpses to rot. There’s no nostalgia for the past here, no remaining love for order and beauty. As a wise person utters in this episode, “It’s time to return to our regularly scheduled shitstorm.”

The opening sequence of the season five opener calls to mind a haunting statement from the final episode of season four: “The more people become part of us, the stronger we get.” In a flashback, Gareth (whose name I apparently spelled incorrectly last season) and Mary, trapped inside the cargo container and flickering in dying candlelight, desperately ask themselves what they are now – who they’re becoming. As in season four, nobody really knows who they are in this post-apocalyptic mess, and as people flail, scrabble to get a grip on normalcy, things get messy.

Back in the present, our band of increasingly morally ambiguous outlaws prepares to fight its way out of the shipping container. They’re ready to go out swinging, but aren’t prepared for a smoke bomb dropped through the roof. It incapacitates them just enough to allow the cannibals to bind and carry Rick, Glenn, Bob, and Daryl to the killing trough, along with four others who don’t belong to us. As the eight men kneel, prone, in front of the metal trough, burly men in plastic raincoats first knock them unconscious, then slit their throats, gushing blood into the trough. First one, then the next, creeping ever closer to Glenn. The viscous fluid pools around the drain as our quad of men watches, helpless. Just as the butcher reels back to take a mighty swing at Glenn’s head, Gareth shows up to ask for their shot count. “I’m sorry, it was my first roundup!” the second butcher says, distracting everyone for long enough to save Glenn’s life. In the midst of chaos, it is in fact bureaucracy, red tape, a “required quota” that saves our protagonists.

This fucking guy. Photo credit Gene Page/AMC.

This fucking guy. Photo credit Gene Page/AMC.

Bob tries to talk Gareth down – he’s the nice one. Rick, on the other hand, eyes him with utter rage and contempt. Gareth is after the bag of guns they stashed in the woods, and as he holds a wickedly sharp knife a millimeter from Bob’s eye, Rick gives him the info he needs. It contains some AK-47s, an arsenal of other weapons, and a machete with a red handle. “That’s what I’m gonna use to kill you,” he tells Gareth – and you know what? I wouldn’t fuck with Rick at this point. The man is hardened and he’s not kidding.

And suddenly, the world explodes. Read more

The Walking Dead Recap: “A” (Season 4, Episode 16)

First things first: did the writers really think a corny, Western-style one-liner like that was going to satisfy us? Rick Grimes is no Walter White, and Andrew Lincoln and the showrunners are frankly not capable of making something like “They’re screwing with the wrong people” into the stuff of legend. It is no “Tread lightly,” that’s for sure. The finale as a whole was clumsy and unsatisfying. Everyone in the episode was asking “Who am I? Who are you? Who are we?” But the age-old existential dilemma doesn’t power the action; it hinders it. And as they’re all wondering who they are, they don’t stop to think about whether they’re walking straight into a trap.

Walking Dead Rick

Monsters all. Photo credit Gene Page/AMC.

“A” bounces us from past (at the prison) to present (on the road), as the writers are wont to do these days. This episode’s jumps from past to present and back are effective; they reinforce the point that nothing gold can stay. In the opening sequence, we flash back to the halcyon days trapped between the chain link fences of the prison. Hershel’s still alive and Maggie’s smiling as they return from a run. Everyone’s content, pleasantly calm as the prison crew pokes the walkers through the chainlink with crowbars. A jarring cut to the present focuses on Rick’s bloody hands and face; he sits with his back against a truck, staring into the space beyond the camera. The last time we saw him like this, it was after he beat the hell out of Tyreese. He crouches in silence, and the camera lingers long enough on his face for us to wonder where Michonne and Carl could be.

Post-credits, we return to earlier that same day. On the tracks, Carl wonders aloud if they’re going to be able to tell the folks at Terminus who they are, like, really. Rick understands exactly what he’s asking, but he can’t answer that. How do you say who you are when this is who you are? None of them feel like they’re good people, and how could they? Read more

The Walking Dead Recap: “Us” (Season 4, Episode 15)

Last week’s “The Grove,” a harrowing vignette if ever there was one, led us full circle. Having contemplated separating, having daydreamed of making simple lives in safe spaces, all of our characters were on their (not-so) merry way to Terminus, poor Lizzie and Mika excluded. This week, the writers had to pick us up, brush us off, and pat our metaphorical backsides so we’d keep on marching. So they took us back to the various other splinters – namely, to everybody’s favorite estranged lovers, Glenn and Maggie.

As they trudge along the tracks, Dr. Eugene Porter talks at Tara, who remains largely silent, her brow furrowed. “You cannot say for certain,” Eugene tells her, that the zombie plague “isn’t what killed off the dinosaurs.” The idea of undead dinosaurs is pretty rad, I’ve gotta admit. However, Tara is not and never was Porter’s kind of nerd. She also doesn’t swing that way. Once the sun sets, Ford and Tara stay up to watch over Eugene, their precious package, who snoozes next to Rosita and Glenn on the tracks. This scene calls back to the one in which Carol and Lizzie watched over Tyreese as he thrashed from a nightmare of Karen. Ford notes idly that Tara hasn’t slept at all yet. He’s curious why she’s here, and he thought at first she was in love with Glenn. “But I saw the way you were lookin’ down Rosita’s shirt when she was serving you dinner,” he continues mildly, to which she apologizes, equally softly. She ‘s running ragged paying her penance, and she asks Ford, a military man, “What do you do when the mission’s over?”

Rick, Carl, Michonne Walking Dead

It’s all fun and games. Photo credit Gene Page/AMC.

Meanwhile, Michonne and Carl play “who can balance on the track the longest” while Rick thinks pragmatically about water supplies. Despite himself it makes Rick grin to see Carl happy and laughing. They bet on candy bars, and in an attempt to startle Carl, Michonne loses her own balance. She hands him the last “Big Kat” bar, and Carl gives her a piece of his winnings. In this scene, civilization prevails. It’s such a rarity anymore in the series that it’s duly sweet. They’re cute together. Everybody’s forming their own little families. Read more

I’ve redecorated. Help warm my (metaphorical) house!

Big things are afoot. In the last few months I’ve decided firmly to take my own happiness, my few belongings, my space (both physical and online), and my work, and shape it into something that makes me feel proud and comfortable.

Needless to say, I’m a little extra antisocial and more depleted than usual. On top of moving and assembling actual furniture, figuring placement of decorations and lights, and deciding (yet again) to renew the lease with my less-than-ideal landlady, I’m also studying for a huge exam that’ll help me obtain a three-letter title (and hopefully more mobility and more money). Finally, I’m revamping this place (which has a much better landlord). The redecoration process has been lengthy and unexciting – but it is nearly complete.

Just in time for the final season of Mad Men, I’ve archived all of my recaps of seasons 5 and 6 (and holy shit, do you guys remember just how trippy season 5 was?). Likewise, all my recaps of The Walking Dead are up, starting from a blog after the series premiere and continuing all the way through to this Sunday’s episode. Finally, use the navigation up top to browse through old movie reviews; they’re loosely categorized for search purposes. I only put up the ones I want to show you. It’s kind of like rearranging my downstairs bookshelf so that the pretty hardcovers, the “sophisticated” Salinger, Oates, and Chabon are on display. The Charlaine Harris and Stephen King books reside upstairs (and are dogeared because I love them).

I’m no graphic designer, but in preparation for Mad Men I’ve pasted up some temporary wallpaper that’ll make your eyes twitch (like so many of the color combos of the 1960s did). I also made my hair purple, because you know what? I feel purple.

Settling is for suckers.

Settling is for suckers.

So come in, please, and make yourself comfortable. Make yourself a martini. Do take a tour. It ain’t much, but it’s home. For now.